1-800-AIR-DUCT info@safetyking.com

Blog

Sagging flex duct is bad for air flow. We all know it. We all talk about it. It turns out there’s research data to prove it, too. Texas A&M did a study a few years ago to look at the pressure drop that occurs for different levels of compression. If you’re not familiar with this study, the results may astound you.

hvac-duct-flex-poorly-supported-reduced-airflow-energy-vanguard

Papers about scientific research aren’t always the easiest reading, but stick with me and I’ll see if I can make this one as painless as an Irish Car Bomb. (I’m talking about the drink, not an actual bomb!) The paper I’m writing about here is titled, Static Pressure Losses in 6, 8, and 10-inch Non-Metallic Flexible Ducts, (pdf) by Kevin Weaver and Dr. Charles Culp. If you’d like to read it, click that link in the last sentence and dive in. If not, let me give you what I see as the big takeaways in their work.

What they did

Briefly, the researchers set up a test apparatus that let them control the air flow through a section of duct, both rigid and flex. Then they changed some of the properties of the flex duct to see what happened to the air flow and static pressure. The diagram below shows the test apparatus.

flex-duct-static-pressure-air-flow-losses-test-setup

The variables they looked at were:

Compression of flex duct – How long was the duct compared to its maximum stretch? They looked at 5 variations here: maximum stretch and compressions of 4%, 15%, 30%, and 45%. Note that compression in this use refers to the degree that the duct wasn’t stretched out to its full length. It has nothing to do with being squeezed around the middle.

Support – They supported the flex duct in two ways. Either it was completely supported on a board, or it was supported on 1.5″ wide joists that were 24″ on center. The board-supported duct had only compression. The joist-supported duct had both compression and sag.

Sag – With joist-supported duct, they looked at natural sag and long-term sag. The difference between the two is that long-term sag represents and extreme case.

Duct size – They used 6″, 8″, and 10″ diameter round ducts.

flex-duct-static-pressure-air-flow-losses-sag-lengths

The table above shows the amount of sag for the different compression percentages and duct sizes. Note the highlighted cells. They point to the sag for the 6″ duct, which is the size I’m going to focus on in this article. At low compression, the natural and long-term sag are the same. When you get up to 30% sag, though, they begin to diverge. At 45% compression, the 6″ duct has 7″ of natural sag and 11.5″ of long-term sag.

What they found

The researchers looked at the static pressure in inches of water column (i.w.c.) versus air flow in cubic feet per minute (cfm). They compared what happens in various states of compression for flex duct to what happens in rigid metal duct. Each graph below is for a different compression, beginning with a perfect installation that has no compression.

Also, each graph suffers from the tendency of academics to make things too complicated. They show as many as 12 curves on one graph. Ughh! I didn’t have time to replot the data and make them easier to understand, so I’m going to direct your attention to the data for the 6″ ducts only. They’re the ones with the circles for data points. Just ignore all the triangles and squares.

0% Compression. What you see in the first graph is that there’s essentially no difference between perfectly installed flex duct and rigid metal duct. The curves for the two types overlap almost perfectly when you pull the inner liner of flex duct tight.

flex-duct-static-pressure-air-flow-losses-no-compression

4% Compression. The second graph shows what happens when you leave just a little bit of slack in the inner liner of the flex duct. It’s just 4%, but notice the big difference between the flex and the rigid metal duct here. The joist- and board-supported flex overlap each other but are both significantly higher than the rigid metal duct.

flex-duct-static-pressure-air-flow-losses-4-percent-compression

Looking at the 6″ duct data (the circles), find where each curve crosses the 0.1 i.w.c. static pressure line. If you read the air flow for each, you’ll see that the 4% compressed flex is moving about 70 cfm, whereas the rigid metal duct is moving about 110 cfm. Wow! That’s a huge difference and we’re only at 4% compression!

What this analysis shows is that the lower the curve on this graph, the better. The higher it is, the worse it is.

15% Compression. The performance of flex duct at 15% compression is significantly worse than sheet metal and also worse than flex at 4% compression. We can tell it’s gotten worse than at 4% compression because the scale of static pressure has increased. At 0% compression, the maximum static pressure was 0.225 i.w.c. At 4% compression, it rose to 0.8 i.w.c. Here at 15% compression, the static pressure scale goes all the way up to 3 i.w.c.

flex-duct-static-pressure-air-flow-losses-15-percent-compression

In addition, we see a new pattern developing. Now we see a difference between joist-supported and board-supported flex. You know which one is worse without even looking, right? (Recall from the last graph that the higher the curve, the worse it is.)

Another way to look at this is to notice that to keep the 70 cfm we had at 0.1 i.w.c. with 4% compression, we now have to have 0.25-0.5 i.w.c., depending on whether the flex is board- or joist-supported. Higher pressure means more fan power, which means more energy use.

30% Compression. Again, we see a big drop in performance. The curves move up. The maximum on the pressure scale this time is 7 i.w.c. To maintain 70 cfm in flex with this level of compression, we need 0.5-1.0 i.w.c. That is, more fan power and more energy use.

flex-duct-static-pressure-air-flow-losses-30-percent-compression

Also, they’ve plotted the other type of joist-supported data, those for long-term sag (i.e., worst case). Natural and long-term sag aren’t so different at 30% compression, though. Hmmm. I wonder what the 45% data will show?

45% Compression. Surprise! Surprise! Well, OK. There’s no surprise here. Everything again is much worse. The scale now goes up to 9 i.w.c. The flex with long-term sag is significantly worse than the flex with natural sag, which is worse than board-supported flex.

flex-duct-static-pressure-air-flow-losses-45-percent-compression

And to get 70 cfm of air flow in the ducts, we need nearly 1 to nearly 2 i.w.c. of pressure.

The big takeaways

Actually, that’s a pretty good title for this section. The big takeaways are that flex duct not pulled tight takes away a lot of air flow if you have a fixed-speed blower or it takes away a lot of your money if you have a blower that tries to maintain the flow no matter what it does to the pressure.

Also, apparently these data were the subject of a lot of debate on the Manual D committee. According to David Butler:

“When the latest (3rd) edition of Manual D was in development, there was a lot of discussion about friction rates of poorly installed flex. Texas A&M, having studied this, provided data from its research for inclusion in the manual, the idea being to give designers an idea of real-world friction rates, and hopefully persuade diligent contractors to follow recommended installation practice.”

He wrote that in a comment in my earlier article about how to install flex duct properly. In that article I posted a related diagram from the Air Diffusion Council’s installation manual for flex duct. It showed that when flex duct has 15% compression, you should double the friction rate. When it has 30% compression, you should quadruple the friction rate. (They don’t discuss 45% compression.)

If you look at these data from the Texas A&M study, you can see that the doubling and quadrupling are actually a bit optimistic. For joist-supported flex at 30% compression, for example, it’s more like a factor of 10, not 4.

Of course, you could use the data from this study to aid your design, and they do show all this now in Appendix 17 of Manual D. To design for proper air flow with improperly installed ducts would be downright stupid, though. If you can’t install it properly, use rigid metal duct.

Is flex duct worth the effort?

In my opinion, flex duct is just fine as long as you don’t abuse it. Pull it tight. Use it mainly for straight runs. Occasionally, you may find a place where you can make a long, gentle turn, and that can be OK. The analysis done by the Texas A&M researchers, however, applied only to straight runs of flex duct. It doesn’t apply to the extra turbulence you get when you make a mess of turning the air. If you do really stupid stuff, like put a sharp kink in it as shown below, that only adds to the problems of the liner not being pulled tight.

The problem is that most flex duct is installed horribly. The two photos I’ve included in this article are a tiny part of my collection. (Be sure to check out my new favorite duct disaster!) But installers get away with it by oversizing the heating and air conditioning systems so the bigger blower might have a chance of making the house reasonably comfortable.

hvac-flex-duct-sharp-bend-reduced-airflow-comfort-600

There you have it. Flex duct can work, or it can go horribly wrong. Now, you bring the Guinness, I’ll bring the Jameson and the Bailey’s, and we can start discussing the deeper issues like double-stud walls versus exterior insulated walls, the proper metric for measuring the airtightness of Passive Houses, and whether or not Joe Lstiburek can stand on his head, drink a beer, and sing O Canada all at the same time. And after a couple or five Irish Car Bombs, we may all be standing on our heads.

Schedule Inspection

 

Aeroseal May 11
The Aeroseal Process is more important than ever with Michigan’s newest Energy Code Update

The images to the right show the Certificates of Completion generated after an Aeroseal Duct Sealing. A certificate is generated for both the supply, and return side of your HVAC system. Click on the images for a closer look.

The results shown are from a very successful Aeroseal application from two of our best technicians, Bill and Tyler. With the Aeroseal process, they were able to improve the energy efficiency of this customer’s air ducts by a combined 83%! We show each of our Aeroseal customers this comprehensive report so they have a visual representation of their improved air efficiency and energy costs.

Give Safety King a call for more information about what the Aeroseal process would be like in your own home. Our technicians at Safety King are experts in the process and consistently receive positive feedback from our customers.

If you’re interested in having your air ducts sealed tight, click the button below or call us at 1-800-Aeroseal for more information!Aeroseal May 11 2

More Aeroseal Info

 


Michigan’s Energy Code has an important new update!

Effective February 8th 2016, all new homes and some residential additions or renovations must comply with the updated code standards. The new code has significant changes from the last one so it is important to give these updates a read. Critical changes include:

  • Window U-Factors must be .32 or lower (improved temperture insulation)
  • Crawlspace insulation is R-15 continuous or R-19 cavity (R-value is insulation thikness)
  • Blower door testing is required and the maximum allowable leakage is 4 ACH50 (average unverified home is 10 ACH50)
  • Automatic whole house mechanical ventilation is required
  • Lights and or fixtures must be 75% CFL or LED (much more efficient than traditional bulbs)
  • Band joist insulation needs to be covered with an air-barrier (sheathing or spray-foam)
  • Sealed ductwork is required, and if ANY portion of the ductwork is outside the thermal envelope, it must be tested for airtightness
  • Building cavities may NOT BE USED AS DUCTS, including returns. Fully ducted systems only

FB post 4-20-16

You may be thinking to yourself, “Where do I begin to reach these new standards of efficiency?” Well Safety King has the equipment and training to help you meet some of the requirements above. With our Aeroseal equipment, we can make sure you don’t exceed the maximum allowable duct leakage.

Our technicians will find any evidence of unsealed or unregulated duct work. The Aeroseal process has been proven to seek and seal any gap in your duct work, which will help you reach the new Michigan standards of energy efficiency. After having your air ducts cleaned out and sealed, the lungs of your home will be breathing strong and fresh.

This image shows the Certificates of Completion generated after an Aeroseal Duct Sealing and details the improvement in the airflow of an HVAC system. A certificate is generated for both the supply, and return side of your HVAC system. Click on the image for a closer look.

 

If you’re interested in having your air ducts sealed tight, click the button below or call us at 1-800-Aeroseal for more information!

More Aeroseal Info

 


The Aeroseal process will be featured on the TV show, “Ask This Old House” on April 28th!

The image below show the Certificates of Completion generated after an Aeroseal Duct Sealing. A certificate is generated for both the supply, and return side of your HVAC system. Click on the image for a closer look.

4-4-16 Aeroseal Post

The Aeroseal Process will be displayed on the TV Show “Ask This Old House” on PBS April 28th. This is an excellent opportunity for you to learn all about the process and decide if it’s what your home needs.

The show will highlight the symptoms of leaky air ducts and teach you what can be done to minimize the gaps in your duct work. Once you have a good idea of where your leaks are, you can work toward improving your air efficiency and reducing energy costs.

aeroseal-this-old-house-pbs

After watching, give Safety King a call for more information about what the Aeroseal process would be like in your own home. Our technicians at Safety King are experts in the process and consistently receive positive feedback from our customers.

 

 

If you’re interested in having your air ducts sealed tight, click the button below or call us at 1-800-Aeroseal for more information!

More Aeroseal Info

 

The Shelby Savings App is free and grants access to a wide variety of referrals and discounts for local businesses!

icon-appIf you have the Shelby Savings App then we are happy to announce that Safety King is now featured in the “Air Duct Cleaners” section! If you do not have the Shelby Savings App, you can download the Apple App or Google Play App now for FREE! The logo will look like the image on the right.

This app was created for the communities of Utica and Shelby Township so local businesses who hire local employees will thrive with the help of local customers. If you’re looking for a nice restaurant, an accountant, or even an air duct cleaning company, the Shelby Savings App features local businesses that provide these services and everything in between.

 

If you live near the Shelby-Utica area, don’t miss out on this useful app! Press the button below for more information,

Shelby Savings App

 


Aeroseal March 18 2016Safety King’s Aeroseal process has proven to be effective by showing incredible results!

The images on the right show the Certificates of Completion generated after our most recent Aeroseal Duct Sealing. A certificate is generated for both the supply, and return side of your HVAC system. Click on one for a closer look.

This certificate details the leakage in our customer’s duct work before and after the sealing process. The graph illustrates how the amount of leaking air is reduced throughout the process. We show each of our Aeroseal customers this comprehensive report so they have a visual representation of their improved air efficiency and energy costs.

Safety King has perfected the Aeroseal process showing consistently great results from each home. Our results combined with our overwhelmingly positive feedback gives us confidence in the quality of our Aeroseal service.

 
 
 

Aeroseal March 18 2016-1

If you’re interested in having your air ducts sealed tight, click the button below or call us at 1-800-AIR-DUCT for more information!

More Aeroseal Info

 


Scroll to Top